Page 34 - vwuk-1-7

This is a SEO version of vwuk-1-7. Click here to view full version

« Previous Page Table of Contents Next Page »

Page 34 Contractors World - UK & Ireland Vol 1 No 7

were joined by Bill’s grandson Gary, who works at the World HQ, Rocester and Bill’s great-grandson Leigh, who works at the World Parts Centre, Utoxeter. The exhibition covers 2,500 m² of floorspace and includes 14 zones which take the visitor on a journey through tme, startng in the 1820s, when the Bamford fami ly were blacksmiths in Uttoxeter through to the present day and JCB’s ECO range of fuel-saving machines.

It includes a section highlighting the engineering prowess of Bamfords Ltd, the firm of agricultural engineers based in Utoxeter, whose Director Henry Bamford famously sacked his nephew Joseph Cyril Bamford by sending him a note that “his services would no longer be required.”

Mr Bamford’s subsequent success and the huge global growth of the company under the stewardship of his son Sir Anthony, Chairman for almost 36 years, are highlighted in the zones. The area occupied by the ‘Story of JCB’ exhibition housed the JCB Design Centre and Production Drawing Office from 1970 until the early 1980s, when product-specific business units were introduced and designers and draughtsmen relocated.

Visitors today are taken past Mr Bamford’s old office, which he used from 1970 until his retirement in 1975. Always at the centre of engineering design and development, it gave him a complete window on the world of JCB. From this side of his office he could access his design management and draughtsmen and from the window at the rear he could view the progress of product development in the research workshop situated below. The ofce stll contains Mr Bamford’s original desk, chairs and conference table. Visitors will also see a bronze bust of Mr JCB on his desk, which was a gif from the JCB workforce in 1964, the year in which he presented in excess of £250,000 in productvity bonuses to his staf. The exhibition is also populated by 10 of the landmark JCB machines

through the ages which had to be craned through the roof as the attraction took shape. They include one of Mr Bamford’s frst products, a hydraulic tpping trailer, and a 1962 JCB 3 backhoe loader which has been restored. The centrepiece of the exhibiton is a giant skeletal model of a JCB JS200 tracked excavator built to scale out of 8 mm steel rod and created by renowned artst Benedict Radclife, some of whose work is currently on display in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. The fnished artwork took fve months to complete, used around one kilometre of steel rod and weighs around two tonnes – a tenth of the weight of the actual machine it represents. The exhibition also covers sections on how the JCB name was built into a global brand; JCB’s design and innovaton ethos; the expansion into a global manufacturer; its growth as an agricultural machinery manufacturer; JCB’s worldwide service and parts back-up; JCB military products and the development of the JCB engine and the record-breaking Dieselmax car.

JCB currently welcomes around 15,000 visitors from all over the world and this fgure is expected to rise to 20,000 from next year as a result of the exhibiton’s development.

Arrangements are now being made to open the exhibiton to JCB employees and their families over the next few months. There will be some limited opportunites for the general public to visit the atracton, details of which will be publicised in advance via a special web site.

A giant skeletal model of a JCB JS200 tracked excavator built to scale out of 8 mm steel rod and created by

renowned artst Benedict Radclife

       More information: JCB - The Story of JCB

Email  

The original JCB tpping trailer . From small beginnings . . .

Page 34 - vwuk-1-7

This is a SEO version of vwuk-1-7. Click here to view full version

« Previous Page Table of Contents Next Page »